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Tuesday, January 03, 2006

PAPROCKI, Thomas "Pap"

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Birth/Death

Birth: 1902
Death: January 4th, 1973

Occupation/Title

Sports Cartoonist/ Illustrator

Bio Summary

During the first half of the 20th century, newspapers thrived because television had yet to dominate the America. At the same time, sports cartoonists enjoyed the levels of popularity that are usually reserved for the athletes that they illustrated. By the mid-1940s, Pap Paprocky became well – known through his nationally syndicated illustrated column Sports Slants. Pap’s clever and stylish spot-cartoons that peppered the perimeter of his drawings were proven to be successful and their popularity lasted nearly 40 years.

Early Life/Family

Education/Training
Before becoming an artist, Pep was sprinter specializing in the 440-yard run as well as competing in the shot put for the Loughlin Lyceum team of Brooklyn. Fordham university offered him athletic scholarship, but he declined and worked at Brooklyn department store instead.

Career Outline

During mid 20’s, Pap was working at New York American. But from 1932 to 1967, he worked for Associated Press and had done over 6,000 illustrations.

Comments On Style

Pap's artwork was best known for dynamic composition, strong black line work, dead-on player likenesses, and subtle use of gray tones.

Influences

Personality

He was best described as a broad-shouldered, hearty, congenial man with a year-round tan and an addiction to brown sports coats, brown shirts, brown slacks and elaborate practical jokes.

Anecdotes

Miscellaneous

Filmography

Honors

Related Links

A-HAA: Cartooning: Byrnes' Complete Guide To Cartooning Part Three

Bibliographic References

BIO-AAA-503

Contributors To This Listing

Won C Hwang

To make additions or corrections to this listing, please click on COMMENTS below...

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2 Comments:

At 5:48 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Name: Thomas “Pap” Paprocky

Birth: 1902
Death: January 4th, 1973

Occupation: Sports Cartoonist/ Illustrator

Bio: During the first half of the 20th century, newspapers thrived because television had yet to dominate the America. At the same time, sports cartoonists enjoyed the levels of popularity that are usually reserved for the athletes that they illustrated. By the mid-1940s, Pap Paprocky became well – known through his nationally syndicated illustrated column Sports Slants. Pap’s clever and stylish spot-cartoons that peppered the perimeter of his drawings were proven to be successful and their popularity lasted nearly 40 years.

Early Life/Family

Education/ Training:
Before becoming an artist, Pep was sprinter specializing in the 440-yard run as well as competing in the shot put for the Loughlin Lyceum team of Brooklyn. Fordham university offered him athletic scholarship, but he declined and worked at Brooklyn department store instead.

Career Outline:
During mid 20’s, Pap was working at New York American. But from 1932 to 1967, he worked for Associated Press and had done over 6,000 illustrations.

Comments On Style
Pap's artwork was best known for dynamic composition, strong black line work, dead-on player likenesses, and subtle use of gray tones.

Personality:
He was best described as a broad-shouldered, hearty, congenial man with a year-round tan and an addiction to brown sports coats, brown shirts, brown slacks and elaborate practical jokes.

Anecdotes

Miscellaneous

Filmography

Honors

Related Links

Bibliographic References:

http://www.philadelphiaathletics.org/cart/papartwork2.htm

Contributors To This Listing:

Won C Hwang

 
At 8:02 PM, Blogger morteight said...

During the 1940's I cut the Pap cartoon from the New York Sun every day. I have them in albums and there are thousands of them. They are one of my prized possessions

 

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